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Zamolxis, Dacians and Romania

The Supreme Council of Magistrates in Romania has decided to suspend Judge Mihaela Ciocea for delays in case work.
Secția pentru judecători a Consiliului Superior al Magistraturii a decis, pe 18 septembrie, sancționarea disciplinară a judecătoarei Mihaela Ciocea pentru nerespectarea în mod repetat și din motive imputabile a dispozițiilor legale privitoare la soluționarea cu celeritate a cauzelor ori întârzierea în efectuarea lucrărilor. (via CSM: Judecătoarea Mihaela Ciocea de la Curtea de Apel București, suspendată din funcție – AGERPRES)

The Supreme Council of Magistrates in Romania has decided to suspend Judge Mihaela Ciocea for delays in case work.
Secția pentru judecători a Consiliului Superior al Magistraturii a decis, pe 18 septembrie, sancționarea disciplinară a judecătoarei Mihaela Ciocea pentru nerespectarea în mod repetat și din motive imputabile a dispozițiilor legale privitoare la soluționarea cu celeritate a cauzelor ori întârzierea în efectuarea lucrărilor. (via CSM: Judecătoarea Mihaela Ciocea de la Curtea de Apel București, suspendată din funcție – AGERPRES)

Tagged with:  #romania  #csm  #judge  #judges  #mihaela ciocea
I write to you from Bucharest, Romania. I came here with my husband and 3 daughters in May 2013. I came with no expectations, no pre-conceived notions….or so I thought. When I broke the news of our impending departure, most of my friends exclaimed “What!” followed swiftly by “Why?! I left Ireland with 4 bags, 3 children, 2 bikes, 1 husband and myself. I felt a little like the emigrants of old….nervous, anxious and somewhat desolate. As if I would never see Ireland again. (via Reflections on Romania | City Compass)
My children laugh and play with their Romanian friends, completely at ease, though neither child knows the language of the other; Culture, music, wine and food; The ability to communicate whether that be in English, Romanian, French or German; New friends…some will move on…some will stay…some will remain friends for life; Interacting with the country locals in the mountains..helping a stranger to put a wheel back on his horse and cart loaded with wood (using a car jack); Travelling in the Balkans…Bulgaria, Serbia, Macedonia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Turkey – countries previously only vaguely heard about; Campfires by the Danube; Boating in the Delta; Hot summers and cold winters.
We, as a family, have become stronger and we have found our niche in Bucharest. We play football with the Brits, go on camping trips with the Americans and drink with the Paddies. But we go to school, children’s parties and Mozart concerts with the Romanians. Every day I am surprised and at times overwhelmed by their indomitable spirit, hospitality and generosity.

I write to you from Bucharest, Romania. I came here with my husband and 3 daughters in May 2013. I came with no expectations, no pre-conceived notions….or so I thought. When I broke the news of our impending departure, most of my friends exclaimed “What!” followed swiftly by “Why?! I left Ireland with 4 bags, 3 children, 2 bikes, 1 husband and myself. I felt a little like the emigrants of old….nervous, anxious and somewhat desolate. As if I would never see Ireland again. (via Reflections on Romania | City Compass)

  • My children laugh and play with their Romanian friends, completely at ease, though neither child knows the language of the other; Culture, music, wine and food; The ability to communicate whether that be in English, Romanian, French or German; New friends…some will move on…some will stay…some will remain friends for life; Interacting with the country locals in the mountains..helping a stranger to put a wheel back on his horse and cart loaded with wood (using a car jack); Travelling in the Balkans…Bulgaria, Serbia, Macedonia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Turkey – countries previously only vaguely heard about; Campfires by the Danube; Boating in the Delta; Hot summers and cold winters.
  • We, as a family, have become stronger and we have found our niche in Bucharest. We play football with the Brits, go on camping trips with the Americans and drink with the Paddies. But we go to school, children’s parties and Mozart concerts with the Romanians. Every day I am surprised and at times overwhelmed by their indomitable spirit, hospitality and generosity.
Tagged with:  #romania  #travel  #tourism  #expat  #europe
More than 40% of Romania’s students – or some 235,000 – attended the ten largest state universities in the country, in the school year 2013/2014, according to official documents. Overall, some 540,000 students went to state or private universities in Romania in the school year ended in July 2014, of which 461,000 were in state universities and 79,000 in private universities. Romania has about 50 registered state universities. (via ri)
Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca (36,391 students)
University of Bucharest (30,487 students)
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi (26,200 students)
Bucharest Polytechnic University (25,382 students) is the main technical university in Romania. It was founded in 1864 and was first named the School of Bridges and Roads, Mines and Architecture.
Academy of Economic Studies –ASE- Bucharest (23,678 students)
University of Craiova (20,088 students)
Transylvania University of Brasov (19,985 students)
Cluj-Napoca Technical University (19,687 students)
Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu (16,884 students)
Ovidius University of Constanta (16,533 students)

More than 40% of Romania’s students – or some 235,000 – attended the ten largest state universities in the country, in the school year 2013/2014, according to official documents. Overall, some 540,000 students went to state or private universities in Romania in the school year ended in July 2014, of which 461,000 were in state universities and 79,000 in private universities. Romania has about 50 registered state universities. (via ri)

  1. Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca (36,391 students)
  2. University of Bucharest (30,487 students)
  3. Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi (26,200 students)
  4. Bucharest Polytechnic University (25,382 students) is the main technical university in Romania. It was founded in 1864 and was first named the School of Bridges and Roads, Mines and Architecture.
  5. Academy of Economic Studies –ASE- Bucharest (23,678 students)
  6. University of Craiova (20,088 students)
  7. Transylvania University of Brasov (19,985 students)
  8. Cluj-Napoca Technical University (19,687 students)
  9. Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu (16,884 students)
  10. Ovidius University of Constanta (16,533 students)
Tagged with:  #romania  #university  #education
Dollar debt from the European Union’s second-poorest nation earned 0.8 percent in the third quarter, the most among 13 European nations in the Bloomberg USD Emerging Market Sovereign Bond Index (BEMS), which fell in the period. Notes from Ukraine and Russia led losses for the region amid fighting in the former, flagging euro-area economies and concern the Federal Reserve is moving closer to raising U.S. interest rates. Romania’s economic recovery, government austerity and steps to strengthen local banks may help the notes maintain the outperformance at a time when the Fed is weeks away from ending its bond-buying program, according to Societe Generale SA. Prime Minister Victor Ponta is targeting a budget gap below the EU’s 3 percent of gross domestic product limit for a second year and pledged in May to adopt the euro in 2019. “Romania has become quite a solid credit and should weather any storm better than most other developing countries,” Regis Chatellier, a director of emerging-markets credit strategy at SocGen, said by phone from London on Sept. 29. “They may be a defensive bet against the selloff.” (via Second-Poorest Nation Romania Delivers Best Bond Rally - Bloomberg)
Cuts in public-sector wages and tax increases helped slash the deficit from a record 9 percent of GDP in 2009, when Romania got an IMF-led bailout amid its deepest-ever recession. The economy will expand 3 percent this year, according to the median estimate in a Bloomberg survey.
EU membership since 2007 and IMF oversight have pushed economic changes and mitigated political instability in Romania, which has had 11 prime ministers since communism collapsed in 1989, including three since 2012. The country hasn’t drawn on the bailout funds since 2011 and Ponta’s government doesn’t seek a new credit line after the current program expires in March.
Ponta has been in disagreement with the Washington-based lender over a 5 percent reduction in employers’ social-security tax payments that takes effect today and was designed to encourage companies to hire more. The IMF has said the move is fiscally imprudent and has given the government until November to come up with measures that will offset the lost revenue.
Romanian bonds are partly shielded from swings in global investor sentiment by the country’s lower indebtedness than in most other EU nations. The public-debt ratio of 40 percent of GDP compares with 42 percent in Sweden, 76 percent in Germany, 80 percent in Hungary and an average of 96 percent in the euro area, European Commission estimates for 2014 show.
Surging exports helped narrow Romania’s current-account deficit to 1.7 percent of GDP in the second quarter from a record 14 percent six years earlier, central bank data show. New rules are pushing banks to sell non-performing loans, cutting their ratio to 19.2 percent in June from 20.4 percent in March, according to the regulator.
Standard & Poor’s raised Romanian debt to BBB-, its lowest investment grade, from BB+ in May, rating it one step above Turkey and two notches above wealthier neighbor Hungary. 
The pace of economic growth, the improved current account and budget-deficit cuts have made Romanian assets “much more resilient to external shocks,” according to Stanislava Pravdova, an analyst at Danske Bank A/S in Copenhagen. “Politics in Romania has always been fairly unstable, and this remains a risk for the success story,” she said by phone yesterday. “The ambition to adopt the euro is keeping the country on the right path at the moment, and the IMF program exit shouldn’t jeopardize the economic and fiscal improvements. We have been quite upbeat on Romania and Romanian markets.”

Dollar debt from the European Union’s second-poorest nation earned 0.8 percent in the third quarter, the most among 13 European nations in the Bloomberg USD Emerging Market Sovereign Bond Index (BEMS), which fell in the period. Notes from Ukraine and Russia led losses for the region amid fighting in the former, flagging euro-area economies and concern the Federal Reserve is moving closer to raising U.S. interest rates. Romania’s economic recovery, government austerity and steps to strengthen local banks may help the notes maintain the outperformance at a time when the Fed is weeks away from ending its bond-buying program, according to Societe Generale SA. Prime Minister Victor Ponta is targeting a budget gap below the EU’s 3 percent of gross domestic product limit for a second year and pledged in May to adopt the euro in 2019. “Romania has become quite a solid credit and should weather any storm better than most other developing countries,” Regis Chatellier, a director of emerging-markets credit strategy at SocGen, said by phone from London on Sept. 29. “They may be a defensive bet against the selloff.” (via Second-Poorest Nation Romania Delivers Best Bond Rally - Bloomberg)

  • Cuts in public-sector wages and tax increases helped slash the deficit from a record 9 percent of GDP in 2009, when Romania got an IMF-led bailout amid its deepest-ever recession. The economy will expand 3 percent this year, according to the median estimate in a Bloomberg survey.
  • EU membership since 2007 and IMF oversight have pushed economic changes and mitigated political instability in Romania, which has had 11 prime ministers since communism collapsed in 1989, including three since 2012. The country hasn’t drawn on the bailout funds since 2011 and Ponta’s government doesn’t seek a new credit line after the current program expires in March.
  • Ponta has been in disagreement with the Washington-based lender over a 5 percent reduction in employers’ social-security tax payments that takes effect today and was designed to encourage companies to hire more. The IMF has said the move is fiscally imprudent and has given the government until November to come up with measures that will offset the lost revenue.
  • Romanian bonds are partly shielded from swings in global investor sentiment by the country’s lower indebtedness than in most other EU nations. The public-debt ratio of 40 percent of GDP compares with 42 percent in Sweden, 76 percent in Germany, 80 percent in Hungary and an average of 96 percent in the euro area, European Commission estimates for 2014 show.
  • Surging exports helped narrow Romania’s current-account deficit to 1.7 percent of GDP in the second quarter from a record 14 percent six years earlier, central bank data show. New rules are pushing banks to sell non-performing loans, cutting their ratio to 19.2 percent in June from 20.4 percent in March, according to the regulator.
  • Standard & Poor’s raised Romanian debt to BBB-, its lowest investment grade, from BB+ in May, rating it one step above Turkey and two notches above wealthier neighbor Hungary. 
  • The pace of economic growth, the improved current account and budget-deficit cuts have made Romanian assets “much more resilient to external shocks,” according to Stanislava Pravdova, an analyst at Danske Bank A/S in Copenhagen. “Politics in Romania has always been fairly unstable, and this remains a risk for the success story,” she said by phone yesterday. “The ambition to adopt the euro is keeping the country on the right path at the moment, and the IMF program exit shouldn’t jeopardize the economic and fiscal improvements. We have been quite upbeat on Romania and Romanian markets.”
Tagged with:  #romania  #bonds  #investment
A new ski slope will be built with European funds in Romania’s Fagaras mountains, near Vidraru Lake (via ri, Digi24)
Authorities in Arges county say that a tourist complex will be completed this winter on the Northern side of the Fagaras mountains and ski enthusiasts will be able to enjoy snow for four months a year.
The new slope will have a length of 1,600 meters and will be located 2 km away from the Transfagarasan mountain road. The cost of the project is RON 73 million (some EUR 16 million), reports Digi24.

A new ski slope will be built with European funds in Romania’s Fagaras mountains, near Vidraru Lake (via riDigi24)

  • Authorities in Arges county say that a tourist complex will be completed this winter on the Northern side of the Fagaras mountains and ski enthusiasts will be able to enjoy snow for four months a year.
  • The new slope will have a length of 1,600 meters and will be located 2 km away from the Transfagarasan mountain road. The cost of the project is RON 73 million (some EUR 16 million), reports Digi24.
Tagged with:  #romania  #tourism  #travel  #fagaras  #europe  #ski  #snowboard
Telecom Romania, the Deutsche Telekom-owned operator formerly known as Romtelecom, has chose Viaccess Orca’s Voyage TV everywhere platform as the basis for its multiscreen TV service. Viacess Orca is the primary system integrator on the project, wich will also integrate technology from Cap Gemini, Friendly Technologies, Broadpeak, Harmonic, Accedo and Zenterio, with the Zenterio operating system served on Kaonmedia’s set-top boxes. Voyage includes Viaccess Orca’s RiGHTv service delivery platform and Compass content discovery platform. (via Telekom Romania taps Viaccess Orca for TV everywhere » Digital TV Europe)

Telecom Romania, the Deutsche Telekom-owned operator formerly known as Romtelecom, has chose Viaccess Orca’s Voyage TV everywhere platform as the basis for its multiscreen TV service. Viacess Orca is the primary system integrator on the project, wich will also integrate technology from Cap Gemini, Friendly Technologies, Broadpeak, Harmonic, Accedo and Zenterio, with the Zenterio operating system served on Kaonmedia’s set-top boxes. Voyage includes Viaccess Orca’s RiGHTv service delivery platform and Compass content discovery platform. (via Telekom Romania taps Viaccess Orca for TV everywhere » Digital TV Europe)

Romania’s President Traian Basescu’s youngest daughter Elena Basescu was taken to the hospital after being involved in a car crash in Bucharest. The accident took place in Charles de Gaulle square, near Herastrau park, and was caused by a driver who failed to give priority and bumped into Elena Basescu’s car. She wasn’t injured, but she accepted to be taken to the hospital for further investigations, as she is currently pregnant with her second child. (via ri)

Romania’s President Traian Basescu’s youngest daughter Elena Basescu was taken to the hospital after being involved in a car crash in Bucharest. The accident took place in Charles de Gaulle square, near Herastrau park, and was caused by a driver who failed to give priority and bumped into Elena Basescu’s car. She wasn’t injured, but she accepted to be taken to the hospital for further investigations, as she is currently pregnant with her second child. (via ri)

Tagged with:  #romania  #eba  #elena basescu
Nicolae Corneanu, the bishop of Banat, who irritated Romanian Orthodox Church leaders with his non-traditional views, died Sunday at his residence, church spokesman Lucian Florea said. Bells rang out at Orthodox and Catholic churches Sunday night upon news of his death. In 1997, Corneanu confessed he had been recruited as an informer in 1948 when he was arrested by the communists. He said he had signed papers that led to the excommunication of five dissident priests in 1981 who had accused church leaders of prostituting the church to the demands of communist rulers. He also informed on priests visiting communist Romania. “Of course I made a mistake. … I gave into pressure,” Corneanu said of his actions. Corneanu’s confession confirmed suspicions that Orthodox church clergy had close links with the Securitate and top state organizations under Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu. But he was also praised Monday by Emil Constantinescu, president at the time when Corneanu came clean about his past. “His repentance … freed him of the burden of duplicity, and had others followed his good example, we would have been better prepared for freedom and democracy,” he said. The confession and apology, published in a newspaper interview, was distinctly unorthodox in style and displeased some church leaders, but he gained popularity among ordinary people. Over the years, he also irked church leaders with his tolerance of Catholics and homosexuals. His critics said in exchange for collaborating he was promoted within the church and allowed to travel abroad, a rare privilege. (via BUCHAREST, Romania: Romanian bishop dies; collaborated with communists | World | The News Tribune)

Nicolae Corneanu, the bishop of Banat, who irritated Romanian Orthodox Church leaders with his non-traditional views, died Sunday at his residence, church spokesman Lucian Florea said. Bells rang out at Orthodox and Catholic churches Sunday night upon news of his death. In 1997, Corneanu confessed he had been recruited as an informer in 1948 when he was arrested by the communists. He said he had signed papers that led to the excommunication of five dissident priests in 1981 who had accused church leaders of prostituting the church to the demands of communist rulers. He also informed on priests visiting communist Romania. “Of course I made a mistake. … I gave into pressure,” Corneanu said of his actions. Corneanu’s confession confirmed suspicions that Orthodox church clergy had close links with the Securitate and top state organizations under Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu. But he was also praised Monday by Emil Constantinescu, president at the time when Corneanu came clean about his past. “His repentance … freed him of the burden of duplicity, and had others followed his good example, we would have been better prepared for freedom and democracy,” he said. The confession and apology, published in a newspaper interview, was distinctly unorthodox in style and displeased some church leaders, but he gained popularity among ordinary people. Over the years, he also irked church leaders with his tolerance of Catholics and homosexuals. His critics said in exchange for collaborating he was promoted within the church and allowed to travel abroad, a rare privilege. (via BUCHAREST, Romania: Romanian bishop dies; collaborated with communists | World | The News Tribune)

Tagged with:  #romania  #bor  #church  #orthodox  #communism  #clergy  #bishop
Romanian electricity grid operator Transelectrica will spend some EUR 30 million on revamping the power transformer station at Bradu, which ensures high power connections between Romania’s regions of Muntenia and Oltenia and Transylvania, the company has announced. The power transformer is located in Arges county, and was commissioned in stages between 1974 and 1980. The project should be finalized in 2018 and will consist in completely changing equipment at the station, and adding extra, new devices. (via ri)

Romanian electricity grid operator Transelectrica will spend some EUR 30 million on revamping the power transformer station at Bradu, which ensures high power connections between Romania’s regions of Muntenia and Oltenia and Transylvania, the company has announced. The power transformer is located in Arges county, and was commissioned in stages between 1974 and 1980. The project should be finalized in 2018 and will consist in completely changing equipment at the station, and adding extra, new devices. (via ri)

Bulgarian energy minister Vasil Shtonov said on September 23 that the gas interconnector between Romania and Bulgaria is expected to go into operation in 2015. The pipeline will play a key role in reducing Bulgaria’s dependence on a single energy source, together with the Gas Interconnector Greece-Bulgaria (IGB Pipeline), which is also under construction, Shtonov told the Natural Gas - Infrastructure, Market, and Services conference, according to a statement released by the ministry. The 25-kilometre Romania-Bulgaria pipeline links the southern Romanian village of Comasca with Marten, in northern Bulgaria, under the Danube river. The project includes the construction of a 15 kilometre pipeline in Bulgaria, another 7.5 kilometres in Romania and a 2.5 kilometre underwater section. The maximum design capacity of the pipeline is 1.5 billion cubic metres a year. The other gas pipeline, linking Bulgaria to Greece, is expected to become operational in 2016. The 182-kilometre IGB Pipeline, which will start at the northeastern Greek city of Komotini and end at Stara Zagora, in southern Bulgaria, will carry 3 billion cubic metres of natural gas annually in its initial stage and will have a maximum capacity of 5 billion cubic metres per year. It will be eventually connected to the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP), part of the Southern Gas Corridor. According to Shtonov, the expected supply of one billion cubic metres of gas annually from the Shah Deniz 2 field through the Southern Gas Corridor represents about 40% of the current gas consumption of Bulgaria. (via Interconnector Bulgaria -Romania seen in 2015 | neurope.eu)

Bulgarian energy minister Vasil Shtonov said on September 23 that the gas interconnector between Romania and Bulgaria is expected to go into operation in 2015. The pipeline will play a key role in reducing Bulgaria’s dependence on a single energy source, together with the Gas Interconnector Greece-Bulgaria (IGB Pipeline), which is also under construction, Shtonov told the Natural Gas - Infrastructure, Market, and Services conference, according to a statement released by the ministry. The 25-kilometre Romania-Bulgaria pipeline links the southern Romanian village of Comasca with Marten, in northern Bulgaria, under the Danube river. The project includes the construction of a 15 kilometre pipeline in Bulgaria, another 7.5 kilometres in Romania and a 2.5 kilometre underwater section. The maximum design capacity of the pipeline is 1.5 billion cubic metres a year. The other gas pipeline, linking Bulgaria to Greece, is expected to become operational in 2016. The 182-kilometre IGB Pipeline, which will start at the northeastern Greek city of Komotini and end at Stara Zagora, in southern Bulgaria, will carry 3 billion cubic metres of natural gas annually in its initial stage and will have a maximum capacity of 5 billion cubic metres per year. It will be eventually connected to the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP), part of the Southern Gas Corridor. According to Shtonov, the expected supply of one billion cubic metres of gas annually from the Shah Deniz 2 field through the Southern Gas Corridor represents about 40% of the current gas consumption of Bulgaria. (via Interconnector Bulgaria -Romania seen in 2015 | neurope.eu)