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zamoca

Zamolxis, Dacians and Romania

lunch time in Ghidirim village #transnistria #moldova #everydayeasterneurope #everydaymoldova #vscocam (at Nistru)

lunch time in Ghidirim village #transnistria #moldova #everydayeasterneurope #everydaymoldova #vscocam (at Nistru)

(Source: raminmazur, via inbonobo)

Tagged with:  #photography  #moldova  #lunchtime  #food
Romanian President Traian Băsescu expressed outrage upon learning at the 30 August EU summit that Prime Minister Victor Ponta had made a second nomination for commissioner. It was previously announced that both the President and the Prime Minister back Dacian Cioloș, the present EU Commissioner for Agriculture, for a second term, hopefully with the same portfolio. Băsescu said he had “learned from Brussels” and was extremely surprised that the government had made a second nomination, in addition to that of Cioloș, and accused it of not having respected the nomination procedure. Băsescu, a centre-right politician and Ponta, leader of the ruling socialist party (PSD), are constantly at odds over issues. Romania will hold a presidential election on 2 November and Ponta is widely tipped to win it. His main challenger is Klaus Iohannis, an ethnic German and candidate for President of the centre-right Romanian coalition PNL-PDL. (via EurActiv)

Romanian President Traian Băsescu expressed outrage upon learning at the 30 August EU summit that Prime Minister Victor Ponta had made a second nomination for commissioner. It was previously announced that both the President and the Prime Minister back Dacian Cioloș, the present EU Commissioner for Agriculture, for a second term, hopefully with the same portfolio. Băsescu said he had “learned from Brussels” and was extremely surprised that the government had made a second nomination, in addition to that of Cioloș, and accused it of not having respected the nomination procedure. Băsescu, a centre-right politician and Ponta, leader of the ruling socialist party (PSD), are constantly at odds over issues. Romania will hold a presidential election on 2 November and Ponta is widely tipped to win it. His main challenger is Klaus Iohannis, an ethnic German and candidate for President of the centre-right Romanian coalition PNL-PDL. (via EurActiv)

Deputy premier Liviu Dragnea declared on Thursday that he understands the US Embassy reproach about the emergency government decision allowing the migration of local elected for 45 days without losing their mandate, but mentioned that the government maintains the idea of unblocking the functioning of public administration. (via Dragnea: We understand and consider US Embassy reproach but maintain government decision idea)

Deputy premier Liviu Dragnea declared on Thursday that he understands the US Embassy reproach about the emergency government decision allowing the migration of local elected for 45 days without losing their mandate, but mentioned that the government maintains the idea of unblocking the functioning of public administration. (via Dragnea: We understand and consider US Embassy reproach but maintain government decision idea)

For 18 months the Romanian economy has registered growth but this economic leap has not had any impact on consumers yet, according to data of the GfK study “Consumption climate in Europe for quarter 2, 2014”, released on Thursday. “Expectations on the state of economy is now at 10.4 points. It is an increase of 7 points compare to MArch. A year ago, the indicator was at a similar level of 16.1 points. Income expectations are under the long term average of 0 points - 0.7 points. It means that compared to March the indicator grew by 7.5 points. A year ago it was 5.3 points,” the GfK study shows. (via Romanian economy registers growth with no impact on consumers (study))

For 18 months the Romanian economy has registered growth but this economic leap has not had any impact on consumers yet, according to data of the GfK study “Consumption climate in Europe for quarter 2, 2014”, released on Thursday. “Expectations on the state of economy is now at 10.4 points. It is an increase of 7 points compare to MArch. A year ago, the indicator was at a similar level of 16.1 points. Income expectations are under the long term average of 0 points - 0.7 points. It means that compared to March the indicator grew by 7.5 points. A year ago it was 5.3 points,” the GfK study shows. (via Romanian economy registers growth with no impact on consumers (study))

Tagged with:  #romania  #economy  #consumption  #growth
As a little girl growing up in Sterling Heights, Viorica Magreta dreamed of one day meeting her birth parents. In 1996, at the age of 15 months old, she was rescued/adopted from a Romanian orphanage, then spent the next ten years watching reruns of the Andy Griffith show, eating Kraft macaroni & cheese and playing board games with her dad. But with her adoptive parents open about her history, the 2012 Henry Ford II graduate started wondering about life in the tiny village of Braila where she was born. (via Macomb woman raises money to fund reunion with Romanian birth family)

As a little girl growing up in Sterling Heights, Viorica Magreta dreamed of one day meeting her birth parents. In 1996, at the age of 15 months old, she was rescued/adopted from a Romanian orphanage, then spent the next ten years watching reruns of the Andy Griffith show, eating Kraft macaroni & cheese and playing board games with her dad. But with her adoptive parents open about her history, the 2012 Henry Ford II graduate started wondering about life in the tiny village of Braila where she was born. (via Macomb woman raises money to fund reunion with Romanian birth family)

President Traian Basescu said on Thursday evening at Cotroceni Palace that Romania condemns Russia’s support for separatists in Ukraine, opining that the objective of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is to create a much larger Transnistria in eastern Ukraine. (via am)
'Romania condemns the actions of the Russian Federation meant to support separatists in meeting their objective to be no longer under Ukraine's control, which is a unitary state. In addition, Romania reiterates its support for Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity. According to our assessment, President Putin's objective is to create a much larger Transnistria in eastern Ukraine to block both the ratification of the EU Association Agreement, and the possible advance of Ukraine in its effort to become a member state in the medium term. We remain on Ukraine's side. We are a supporter of Ukraine and we shall do whatever it's possible in legal terms to support this country,' Basescu told a press conference at the Presidential Palace. 
He stressed that the situation at Novoazovsk and Mariopul is also known.  'These are elements that can be considered areas, particularly Novoazovsk, where there are troops of the Russian Federation, but this doesn't mean a great unit, they are infiltrated troops, like in the entire area of eastern Ukraine,' President Basescu said.
President Traian Basescu says Romania does not believe that Ukraine has been invaded; speaking on Thursday evening at the Cotroceni Palace (the seat of Romanian Presidency), he pointed out that an analysis performed by the Foreign Affairs Ministry and the intelligence services of Romania indicates an unbalance in favour of the secessionists supported by Russia.  'I want to make it clear that Romania does not believe Ukraine was invaded. We are not witnessing an invasion,' he said. The president also described the events in eastern Ukraine as a significant escalation of Russia’s aid to secessionists. 

President Traian Basescu said on Thursday evening at Cotroceni Palace that Romania condemns Russia’s support for separatists in Ukraine, opining that the objective of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is to create a much larger Transnistria in eastern Ukraine. (via am)

  • 'Romania condemns the actions of the Russian Federation meant to support separatists in meeting their objective to be no longer under Ukraine's control, which is a unitary state. In addition, Romania reiterates its support for Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity. According to our assessment, President Putin's objective is to create a much larger Transnistria in eastern Ukraine to block both the ratification of the EU Association Agreement, and the possible advance of Ukraine in its effort to become a member state in the medium term. We remain on Ukraine's side. We are a supporter of Ukraine and we shall do whatever it's possible in legal terms to support this country,' Basescu told a press conference at the Presidential Palace. 
  • He stressed that the situation at Novoazovsk and Mariopul is also known.  'These are elements that can be considered areas, particularly Novoazovsk, where there are troops of the Russian Federation, but this doesn't mean a great unit, they are infiltrated troops, like in the entire area of eastern Ukraine,' President Basescu said.
  • President Traian Basescu says Romania does not believe that Ukraine has been invaded; speaking on Thursday evening at the Cotroceni Palace (the seat of Romanian Presidency), he pointed out that an analysis performed by the Foreign Affairs Ministry and the intelligence services of Romania indicates an unbalance in favour of the secessionists supported by Russia.  'I want to make it clear that Romania does not believe Ukraine was invaded. We are not witnessing an invasion,' he said. The president also described the events in eastern Ukraine as a significant escalation of Russia’s aid to secessionists. 
I, of course, was dead set on traveling to another former Communist state. Riga sounded romantic! Vilnius would be an adventure! Bratislava would be a blast! Ben, though, was more into the western part of Europe. “What about Madrid?” he offered.
I was not interested in Madrid, Paris, London or any other top European destination.
So, lacking any sort of consensus, we turned to Lonely Planet’s website and started perusing. That’s when we stumbled upon Romania. The main photo featured an old man sitting atop one of the greenest mountains I’d ever seen and playing some sort of wooden flute. It looked absolutely idyllic.
Because Romania had been behind the Iron Curtain, it fit the bill for me. For Ben, it was perfect because Romanian was a romance language, and therefore, he reasoned, the country was probably somewhat like Western Europe.
This is a uniquely Jewish custom, to wash one’s hands upon exiting a cemetery. And each place we visited in Romania, places that have been fully stripped of their Jewish populations, had an individual who gave us the chance to honor this custom. These Romanian villagers, with no connection to Jewish customs and culture, honored our traditions, more than two generations after Jewish life became a relic of the past in most of these villages. (Samantha Vinokor)
As for Romania’s capital city, Bucharest, I’d recommend that tourists visit but not spend too long. Bucharest lacks the sense of romance that other Eastern European countries seem to have, despite the Iron Curtain’s effects. Ill-kept and dirty, Bucharest is filled with dogs let loose in Ceausescu’s Communist reign, some which roam the streets foaming at the mouth. On Saturday nights, funky restaurants sporadically line vacant cobblestone streets. (Rachel Sales)

I, of course, was dead set on traveling to another former Communist state. Riga sounded romantic! Vilnius would be an adventure! Bratislava would be a blast! Ben, though, was more into the western part of Europe. “What about Madrid?” he offered.

I was not interested in Madrid, Paris, London or any other top European destination.

So, lacking any sort of consensus, we turned to Lonely Planet’s website and started perusing. That’s when we stumbled upon Romania. The main photo featured an old man sitting atop one of the greenest mountains I’d ever seen and playing some sort of wooden flute. It looked absolutely idyllic.

Because Romania had been behind the Iron Curtain, it fit the bill for me. For Ben, it was perfect because Romanian was a romance language, and therefore, he reasoned, the country was probably somewhat like Western Europe.

  • This is a uniquely Jewish custom, to wash one’s hands upon exiting a cemetery. And each place we visited in Romania, places that have been fully stripped of their Jewish populations, had an individual who gave us the chance to honor this custom. These Romanian villagers, with no connection to Jewish customs and culture, honored our traditions, more than two generations after Jewish life became a relic of the past in most of these villages. (Samantha Vinokor)
  • As for Romania’s capital city, Bucharest, I’d recommend that tourists visit but not spend too long. Bucharest lacks the sense of romance that other Eastern European countries seem to have, despite the Iron Curtain’s effects. Ill-kept and dirty, Bucharest is filled with dogs let loose in Ceausescu’s Communist reign, some which roam the streets foaming at the mouth. On Saturday nights, funky restaurants sporadically line vacant cobblestone streets. (Rachel Sales)

(Source: theplanetd.com)

Romania’s piracy rate is twice that of the EU average, leading to crackdowns that have seen huge piles of CDs run over by bulldozers.  Nearly two-thirds of Romania’s computers run at least one piece of illegal software – a sign of a technological heritage that means it now has the most technology workers per capita in Europe. (via The mix of poverty and piracy that turned Romania into Europe’s software development powerhouse | ZDNet)
The country currently has more than 64,000 certified IT professionals, according to Gartner, and plays host to large offices of companies including Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, Bitdefender, and Vodafone.
It may be the second poorest country in the European Union, but Romania is leading Europe in technology workers per capita, and ranks sixth in the world.
The language skills of its IT workers and the low cost of its technology services are the biggest selling points for the country’s technology industry, research company Gartner reports.
However, its mix of technology savvy and poverty means that software piracy is rife in the country. Last year, 62 percent of the PCs in Romania ran illegal software, according to IDC — a figure which hasn’t changed in the past two years.
Romania’s piracy rate is twice that of the EU average, where illegal software is used on 31 percent of machines, and 50 percent higher than the global average of 43 percent.
Software piracy and the large numbers of developers are “absolutely” connected, says Mihai Moldovanu, lead developer for the first Romanian Linux distribution TFM Linux, launched in March 2001. Piracy, along with Romania’s high-speed broadband environment and the country’s tax exemption for programmers, have contributed to the large numbers of developers it has today.
"Software piracy for educational purposes created a collective knowledge about coding, algorithms, and everything that derives from that. Some [users] later chose to go for a paid version of the software, while others such as myself opted for open source," Moldovanu says.

Romania’s piracy rate is twice that of the EU average, leading to crackdowns that have seen huge piles of CDs run over by bulldozers.  Nearly two-thirds of Romania’s computers run at least one piece of illegal software – a sign of a technological heritage that means it now has the most technology workers per capita in Europe. (via The mix of poverty and piracy that turned Romania into Europe’s software development powerhouse | ZDNet)

  • The country currently has more than 64,000 certified IT professionals, according to Gartner, and plays host to large offices of companies including Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, Bitdefender, and Vodafone.
  • It may be the second poorest country in the European Union, but Romania is leading Europe in technology workers per capita, and ranks sixth in the world.
  • The language skills of its IT workers and the low cost of its technology services are the biggest selling points for the country’s technology industry, research company Gartner reports.
  • However, its mix of technology savvy and poverty means that software piracy is rife in the country. Last year, 62 percent of the PCs in Romania ran illegal software, according to IDC — a figure which hasn’t changed in the past two years.
  • Romania’s piracy rate is twice that of the EU average, where illegal software is used on 31 percent of machines, and 50 percent higher than the global average of 43 percent.
  • Software piracy and the large numbers of developers are “absolutely” connected, says Mihai Moldovanu, lead developer for the first Romanian Linux distribution TFM Linux, launched in March 2001. Piracy, along with Romania’s high-speed broadband environment and the country’s tax exemption for programmers, have contributed to the large numbers of developers it has today.
  • "Software piracy for educational purposes created a collective knowledge about coding, algorithms, and everything that derives from that. Some [users] later chose to go for a paid version of the software, while others such as myself opted for open source," Moldovanu says.
The Romanian state reserves the right of postponing the implementation of the schedule for the liberalization of the natural gas price for households until a dispute with the European Commission is settled; therefore, this price will not increase on October 1 as previously scheduled, the Department of Energy informed in a release. (via bakken.com)
A governmental delegation led by the minister for energy Razvan Niculescu participated in consultations with representatives of the Directorate-General for Energy of the European Commission on Monday; the talks concerned national and regional topics of the natural gas industry.
‘There is also a major controversy with the Directorate-General for Enterprise [and Industry] of the European Commission over an alleged ban on natural gas exports from Romania. We have asked the Directorate-General for Energy to get involved into the settlement of this dispute, and they have accepted. We informed about the Romanian state reserving the right of deferring the application of the schedule for the liberalization of the natural gas price for households until this problem is settled. Therefore, we are not going to apply the increase of the price of natural gas agreed by the government led by [Prime Minister Emil] Boc with the European Commission for October 1,’ Niculescu declared.
Romania assumed a liberalization schedule with the International Monetary Fund and the European Commission in 2012; according to it, the gas price should increase by 3 percent on October 1 2014.
Monday’s talks in Brussels also covered the situation between Russia and Ukraine, Romania’s interconnection with the neighbouring countries, the potential of the resources in the Black Sea, the European Commission approach to shale gas, and the Commission’s infringement procedure concerning natural gas.

The Romanian state reserves the right of postponing the implementation of the schedule for the liberalization of the natural gas price for households until a dispute with the European Commission is settled; therefore, this price will not increase on October 1 as previously scheduled, the Department of Energy informed in a release. (via bakken.com)

  • A governmental delegation led by the minister for energy Razvan Niculescu participated in consultations with representatives of the Directorate-General for Energy of the European Commission on Monday; the talks concerned national and regional topics of the natural gas industry.
  • ‘There is also a major controversy with the Directorate-General for Enterprise [and Industry] of the European Commission over an alleged ban on natural gas exports from Romania. We have asked the Directorate-General for Energy to get involved into the settlement of this dispute, and they have accepted. We informed about the Romanian state reserving the right of deferring the application of the schedule for the liberalization of the natural gas price for households until this problem is settled. Therefore, we are not going to apply the increase of the price of natural gas agreed by the government led by [Prime Minister Emil] Boc with the European Commission for October 1,’ Niculescu declared.
  • Romania assumed a liberalization schedule with the International Monetary Fund and the European Commission in 2012; according to it, the gas price should increase by 3 percent on October 1 2014.
  • Monday’s talks in Brussels also covered the situation between Russia and Ukraine, Romania’s interconnection with the neighbouring countries, the potential of the resources in the Black Sea, the European Commission approach to shale gas, and the Commission’s infringement procedure concerning natural gas.
Tagged with:  #romania  #russia  #moldova  #europe  #trade  #free market  #imf
The pipeline cost some 26 million euros ($35 million) and took one year to construct. The EU paid 7 million euros of the cost. Officials said a pipeline from Ungheni to Chisinau is also planned. (via rferl)

The pipeline cost some 26 million euros ($35 million) and took one year to construct. The EU paid 7 million euros of the cost. Officials said a pipeline from Ungheni to Chisinau is also planned. (via rferl)

Tagged with:  #europe  #romania  #moldova  #russia  #gas  #natural gas